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· 4 min read
Xiang Wang

How to run chaos experiments on your physical machine

Chaos Mesh® is a cloud-native Chaos Engineering platform that orchestrates chaos in Kubernetes environments. With Chaos Mesh, you can simulate a variety of failures, and use Chaos Dashboard, a web UI, to manage chaos experiments directly. Since it was open-sourced, Chaos Mesh has been adopted by many companies to ensure their systems’ resilience and robustness. But over the past year, we have frequently heard requests from the community asking how to run chaos experiments when the services are not deployed on Kubernetes.

· 6 min read
Shuyang Wu

Chaos Mesh helps Apache APISIX improve system stability

Apache APISIX is a cloud-native, high-performance, scaling microservices API gateway. It is one of the Apache Software Foundation's top-level projects and serves hundreds of companies around the world, processing their mission-critical traffic, including finance, the Internet, manufacturing, retail, and operators. Our customers include NASA, the European Union's digital factory, China Mobile, and Tencent.

· 11 min read
Yinghao Wang

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Chaos Mesh includes the StressChaos tool, which allows you to inject CPU and memory stress into your Pod. This tool can be very useful when you test or benchmark a CPU-sensitive or memory-sensitive program and want to know its behavior under pressure.

However, as we tested and used StressChaos, we found some issues with usability and performance. For example, why does StressChaos use far less memory than we configured? To correct these issues, we developed a new set of tests. In this article, I'll describe how we troubleshooted these issues and corrected them. This information will enable you to get the most out of StressChaos.

· 5 min read
Debabrata Panigrahi

LFX Mentorship Experience

I’m a junior undergraduate majoring in Biomedical Engineering in the Department of Biotechnology and Medical Engineering at the National Institute of Technology Rourkela, India. For someone who started to code only because I was fascinated by it, it was all a journey of self-learning, filled with various adversities. But when I started with open-source contributions, it was all very beginner-friendly and I came across a lot of people who helped me learn the tech stack better.